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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

3 edition of Late winter foraging ecology of woodland caribou found in the catalog.

Late winter foraging ecology of woodland caribou

Eric Moore Rominger

Late winter foraging ecology of woodland caribou

by Eric Moore Rominger

  • 334 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Woodland caribou -- Ecology,
  • Woodland caribou -- Food

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Eric Moore Rominger.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 57 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages57
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16981337M
    OCLC/WorldCa33820870

    Woodland Caribou: W oodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) ing season and again in late winter when food supplies are restricted. s Woodland caribou have suited to travel and foraging in deep snow. Caribou prefer areas without roads or other developments. Where predation is a major limiting factor, it has been postulated that woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou (Gmelin, )) reduce movements to minimize contact with predators and exhibit fidelity to seasonal examined fidelity behaviour within season and among years of woodland caribou based on locations of 65 radio-collared individuals in British Columbia, by:

    The Comparative Feeding Bahaviour of Large Browsing and Grazing Herbivores. Authors; Authors and affiliations Reid ED () Differential expression of herbivore resistance in late- and mid-seral grasses of the tall grass prairie. Rominger EM () Late winter foraging ecology of woodland caribou. Dissertation, Washington State Cited by:   Roots are a common winter foraging food, but only when the ground isn’t totally frozen solid. They are important to know about, though, because they can provide good calories when needed. Shoots are typically found in late winter as the temperatures gradually start to become warmer.

    Caribou spent – h foraging per day, with lactating caribou having the highest maximum foraging time ( h × day −1), followed by subadults ( h × day −1), and nonlactating caribou ( h × day −1; Figs. 6A and 6B). Lichens are essential winter forage for woodland caribou, with almost 80% of the KCH winter diet composed of terrestrial lichens (Farnell et al., ). Terrestrial lichens consumed by caribou are easily destroyed by forest fires and are known to grow slowly when compared to other early successional vegetation (Bliss and Wien, ).Cited by: 1.


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Late winter foraging ecology of woodland caribou by Eric Moore Rominger Download PDF EPUB FB2

Abstract: To better understand late winter foraging ecology of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) feeding on arboreal lichens, we used bottle-raised caribou in experimental arena trials with artificial trees, and in field trials within historical late-winter habitat.

Factors with. The nearly monophagous late-winter diet re­ ported for woodland caribou Late winter foraging ecology of woodland caribou book these high snowpack ecosystems affords a unique opportunity in wild ungu­ late ecology to recreate an accurate facsimile.

During winter, mountain caribou Rangifer tarandus caribou live in late succes-sional and old-growth coniferous forests, where they feed almost exclusively on arboreal lichens.

Because some of these forests are also valuable to the forest indus-try, caribou ecology and forest management remains a central conservation issue in British by: After visits, caribou tended to rest more than during control days. Caribou reduced time spent foraging during ecotourist visits as the number of observers increased.

The impact of ecotourists appeared to decrease as winter progressed. Visits were short (x ̄ = min) and caribou never left their winter quarters because of human presence Cited by: Mountain caribou, an endangered ecotype of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou Gmelin, ), live in late-successional coniferous forests where they depend largely on arboreal lichens as.

conditions at foraging sites used by caribou on the two winter ranges, we selected a recently used foraging site near each of 19 randomly placed km transects in each study area.

Winter habitat use and foraging patterns of mountain caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) were studied in the North Cariboo Mountains near Prince George, British Columbia.

Radiotelemetry data indicated caribou used balsam-spruce stands ( m) extensively during the early winter (Nov-Dec) period. During late winter (Jan-Apr) caribou shifted to higher elevation subalpine parkland habitats. During mid and late winter, hard-packed snow averaged – g∙cm −2 in hardness and 50–80 cm in depth on all low-lying vegetation.

Under these conditions, caribou cratered only where snow was less than 10–20 cm deep; consequently feeding was limited to the slopes of wind-blown ridges and the tops of high-centre by: Eric M. Rominger. New Mexico Early-winter diet of woodland caribou in relation to snow accumulation, Selkirk Mountains, British Columbia, Canada Late winter foraging ecology of woodland.

Mountain caribou, an endangered ecotype of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou Gmelin, ), live in late-successional coniferous forests where Cited by: Three levels of resource selection (seasonal movements and habitat use, winter feeding site selection, and forage selection), by two populations of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) in west-central British Columbia were examined to evaluate potential effects of logging on those populations.

Seasonal movements and habitat use were determined by monitoring radiocollared adult female. (pooled models) and for individual caribou by period (i.e., early and late winter).

We discuss the implications of these findings for the distribution of barren-ground caribou in the context of forage availability and the risk of predation as influ-enced by wildfire. METHODS Study area This study was focused on the Bathurst caribou by: use of habitat and forage (ground versus arboreal lichens) in winter.

Woodland caribou in the southern two-thirds of British Columbia are nationally threatened and recovery planning is mandatory. Recovery planning focuses on ecotypes but habitat use, selection and foraging ecology may also differ among woodland caribou : Elena S. Jones.

Winter habitat ecology of mountain caribou Introduction Woodland caribou Rangifkr taranidus caribout (Gme-lin) that live in deep snowpack ecosystems of British Columbia, Canada, are typically referred to as 'mountain caribou' (Stevenson & Hatler ; Seip & Cichowski ).

There are approximately of these caribou and all are found in. During winter, mountain caribou Rangifer tarandus caribou live in late successional and old‐growth coniferous forests, where they feed almost exclusively on arboreal lichens. Because some of these forests are also valuable to the forest industry, caribou ecology and forest management remains a central conservation issue in British by: Moreover, woodland caribou both in LSM and elsewhere have lower movement rates in late winter similar to our agent caribou (Ferguson and Elkie,Gustine et al., ).

This reduction in movement rates may be a function of increased snow depth at winter's end, or, as Bradshaw et al. () also suggest, it can be an energy-saving by: A scientific paper in Rangifer projected “complete loss of woodland caribou in Ontario if winter temperatures increase by more than º C by ,”(Masood et al.

If caribou really are doomed by warming in the Anthropocene, expending significant resources to save them might seem a waste of money and effort. We have examined this factor by placing litter bags containing samples of the hair lichens, Alectoria sarmentosa and Bryoria spp., on top of the winter snowpack in the Cariboo Mountains.

Samples were set out in early- (8 Nov.) mid- (16 Jan.) and late- (22 Mar.) winter and subsequently retrieved on spring snow-melt (22 May).Cited by: Multi-scale foraging decisions made by woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) in summer Article (PDF Available) in Canadian Journal of Zoology.

the foraging ecology of several species through- out the year, and Morse (a, b) studied the foraging ecology of unrelated species in summer and winter, respectively. Notably, Morse () presented extensive data on foraging and interactions of mixed winter flock members in File Size: KB. By testing these predictions, we aim to determine whether the presence of young calves affects the distribution of woodland caribou, identify what top‐down and bottom‐up influences on fitness might drive differences in habitat selection, and provide an example of the utility of video collars in wildlife ecology.

2 METHODS Study areaCited by: 3. We examined the foraging behavior of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) relative to the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of their environment. We assessed (1) whether caribou altered their behavior over time while making trade-offs between forage abundance and accessibility; and (2) whether foraging decisions were consistent across spatial scales (i.e., as scale increased, similar Cited by: how woodland caribou are using the habitat in the areas surrounding the ecotype transition zone.

It is possible that variation in habitat selection and foraging strategies by different populations and ecotypes of woodland caribou may be explained by different environmental conditions in Cited by: 4.